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Old 22-09-2005, 05:12 PM   #41
kagemaru
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Originally Posted by jwhtan
please pardon me, I have a few questions too

is there a reason why sunlight should not be mimicked ?? does this mean that arowanas in outdoor ponds that uses purely sunlight has a lower exposure to tanning than one that uses artificial lights tanning but done according to schedule ??

wat is the relation of kelvins to the tanning process ?? I have always thought tanning is through the wavelength of the lights, of perhaps 260nm - 400nm for UVB and UVA ...

since it is also known that glass filters away as much as 95% of the ultra violet rays, will tanning from the side then loses its desired effect ??
hmm...I know u would ask this question...

sunlight on one hand is the best we could get but if u notice the coloration tat comes from sunlight and comes from tanning is slightly different...

basically the difference is the amount of UV...sunlight has ample amount of it...but with a shorter span of time to exposure, its not quite possible to expect a fast conversion using sunlight

the second thing is about the UVB and UVA portion, although technically glass is able to block off the UV, how much of these UV are actually able to block?

LFor example if we were to wear sunglasses and get exposed over a long period under the UV radiation, is it true to say tat our skin under the sunglass is not going to get tanned? its just a matter of speed and effectiveness...

stimulation of the chromatophores is scientifically debatable and u could probably gathered all those involved in their experiment to put out their findings and we can get very vast diff in the argument

The kelvins part is the diff in the intensity of the light stimulation I gathered after trying to use the normal T8 (FL tubes) and compare the different Sunlight tubes (6500k), planted tubes (~7000k), 10k tubes, 12k tubes

and the results from the different tubes showed tat they varies accordingly to the color warmth

in terms of stimulation this is wat I perceives as the contrasting effect, the more the light tends towards the other side of the color spectrum the better is the effects in bringing the melanophores out...hence the deepening of colors
 
Old 22-09-2005, 05:15 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by Vil
after feed market prawn if ur aro chew and spit and chew, water sure cloudy and smelly and bubbles stay very long.... u think water is good? its another way of looking at it
rays are one of the biggest bioload...mine tanks are all designed to handled them...hence should not be a problem with just aros...but Bro liquidnoise type of IOS filtration is too little to handle

he might need to cultivate pandan leaves in one of the compartment of the IOS liao,...if not relink outlet of IOS to a OHF stackable and double the filtration...its not gonna work even if u gonna change all the media inside the compartment --> its simply insufficient to cope

45% wc is dangerous --> for the rays and the aros both...u only need one case of chlorine burnt to take all of them to meet O'mighty (joking)
 
Old 22-09-2005, 05:22 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kagemaru
basically the difference is the amount of UV...sunlight has ample amount of it...but with a shorter span of time to exposure, its not quite possible to expect a fast conversion using sunlight

the second thing is about the UVB and UVA portion, although technically glass is able to block off the UV, how much of these UV are actually able to block?

The kelvins part is the diff in the intensity of the light stimulation I gathered after trying to use the normal T8 (FL tubes) and compare the different Sunlight tubes (6500k), planted tubes (~7000k), 10k tubes, 12k tubes

in terms of stimulation this is wat I perceives as the contrasting effect, the more the light tends towards the other side of the color spectrum the better is the effects in bringing the melanophores out...hence the deepening of colors


the blockage of UV rays by glass is 95% which is actually a lot .... now I understand there is one school of thought that says arowanas do not need that much penetration and even if it is blocked 95%, the 5% is still adequate for the tan .... this will however, contrast sharply with the view that natural sunlight is inadequate for the tanning process ...

regarding the kelvins, my understanding is that it is SI unit of measurement of heat while tanning is the penetration of UVA and UVB wavelengths ... an example is say, we're in a sauna ... well, its damn hot, but we dun get tanned as a result .... i hoped my understanding can be corrected as it may be all wrong
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Old 22-09-2005, 05:29 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jwhtan
the blockage of UV rays by glass is 95% which is actually a lot .... now I understand there is one school of thought that says arowanas do not need that much penetration and even if it is blocked 95%, the 5% is still adequate for the tan .... this will however, contrast sharply with the view that natural sunlight is inadequate for the tanning process ...

regarding the kelvins, my understanding is that it is SI unit of measurement of heat while tanning is the penetration of UVA and UVB wavelengths ... an example is say, we're in a sauna ... well, its damn hot, but we dun get tanned as a result .... i hoped my understanding can be corrected as it may be all wrong
actually the school of tot tat u mentioned is where I originated...but the fact is sunlight is something which the aro is able to escape...

by default reds do not like sunlight...u could probably see them at the bottom of the pond or near the edges where they could find shelters

by putting them in a tank and tan them we are forcing them to take the "light" --> just like asking someone who dun like running to keep running because his hands are tied to the back of the truck

later I paste something of essence to the way light is deciphered in terms of aquarium for us to discuss upon
 
Old 22-09-2005, 05:32 PM   #45
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I extracted this script from one webbie:


The light spectrum describes the combination of colors of which the light consists of. Namely red, yellow, green and blue (rainbow colors). These spectrums are measured as "color temperature" - Kelvin (K).
Red and yellow produce lower temperatures while blue light produces a higher temperature. Lower and higher defined as the basic sunlight with 5500 K.

The Color Rendering Index (CRI) is indexed on a scale from 0 100.

100 being the equivalent to sunlight and how objects would naturally appear. CRI is an expression of the degree to which the illuminated objects appear according to their true natural color.

The intensity of light is given as Lux or lumen. This is very essential, because a light source moved only 2 inches away from the water will be 4 times less intensive. So even if the light source is correct, it might also still be insufficient, depending on the distance to the area to be illuminated.

Some general facts about lighting:

Too much red light in combination with high nutrients will stimulate algae growth. In this case we are talking about 4000 K.

Always adjust the lighting to the natural habitat of your fish. Too much light will not blind, or fry them, but they may hide out.

Dust humidity, water turbidity and dirty vinyl or glass covers will influence the light as well.

Intense lighting in combination with high nutrients will enhance algae growth. Combined with silicates the result will be brownish algae. Combined with phosphates the result is more red and greenish algae.

You should adjust your aquarium lighting to meet the needs of your set-up and inhabitants. There are always possibilities and creative ways to shade some areas with overhangs.






Light is a catalyst. With intense lighting the need for nutrient control is increased to avoid algae problems.




Last edited by kagemaru; 22-09-2005 at 05:50 PM.
 
Old 22-09-2005, 05:32 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kagemaru
actually the school of tot tat u mentioned is where I originated...but the fact is sunlight is something which the aro is able to escape...

by default reds do not like sunlight...u could probably see them at the bottom of the pond or near the edges where they could find shelters

by putting them in a tank and tan them we are forcing them to take the "light" --> just like asking someone who dun like running to keep running because his hands are tied to the back of the truck

later I paste something of essence to the way light is deciphered in terms of aquarium for us to discuss upon
Bro, so in nature, red will go under the water surface where sunlight shine whereas they will swim near surface if no sunlight?
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Old 22-09-2005, 05:36 PM   #47
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Bro, so in nature, red will go under the water surface where sunlight shine whereas they will swim near surface if no sunlight?
heehee...wat do u think the ponds are setup to be?

there are specific purpose towards the way its being put up...be it local farms oroverseas farm...

normally they come up before sun rises too high
 
Old 22-09-2005, 05:36 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aroboy II
Bro, so in nature, red will go under the water surface where sunlight shine whereas they will swim near surface if no sunlight?
i believe this does not just applies 2 red aros...or even aros itself...in nature..fishes will tend 2 avoid staying at the surface when sunlight is at its peak...
 
Old 22-09-2005, 05:41 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kagemaru
actually the school of tot tat u mentioned is where I originated...but the fact is sunlight is something which the aro is able to escape...

by default reds do not like sunlight...u could probably see them at the bottom of the pond or near the edges where they could find shelters

by putting them in a tank and tan them we are forcing them to take the "light" --> just like asking someone who dun like running to keep running because his hands are tied to the back of the truck

later I paste something of essence to the way light is deciphered in terms of aquarium for us to discuss upon
ok let's say in a tank they are unable to hide and henceforth are subjected to compulsory tanning ... but this tanning has 95% of its UV wavelength being filtered out .... however, in an outdoor pond, subject to natural sunlight, the UV rays are direct and intense, w/o the glass blockage and henceforth, no filtering of the UV rays, so even if they hide, how much can they hide ?? cos UV rays penetrate thru water easily
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Old 22-09-2005, 05:43 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kagemaru
I extracted this script from one webbie:


The light spectrum describes the combination of colors of which the light consists of. Namely red, yellow, green and blue (rainbow colors). These spectrums are measured as "color temperature" - Kelvin (K).
Red and yellow produce lower temperatures while blue light produces a higher temperature. Lower and higher defined as the basic sunlight with 5500 K.

The Color Rendering Index (CRI) is indexed on a scale from 0 100.

100 being the equivalent to sunlight and how objects would naturally appear. CRI is an expression of the degree to which the illuminated objects appear according to their true natural color.

The intensity of light is given as Lux or lumen. This is very essential, because a light source moved only 2 inches away from the water will be 4 times less intensive. So even if the light source is correct, it might also still be insufficient, depending on the distance to the area to be illuminated.

Some general facts about lighting:

Too much red light in combination with high nutrients will stimulate algae growth. In this case we are talking about 4000 K.

Always adjust the lighting to the natural habitat of your fish. Too much light will not blind, or fry them, but they may hide out.

Dust humidity, water turbidity and dirty vinyl or glass covers will influence the light as well.

Intense lighting in combination with high nutrients will enhance algae growth. Combined with silicates the result will be brownish algae. Combined with phosphates the result is more red and greenish algae.

You should adjust your aquarium lighting to meet the needs of your set-up and inhabitants. There are always possibilities and creative ways to shade some areas with overhangs.
Light is a catalyst. With intense lighting the need for nutrient control is increased to avoid algae problems.



this article just describes abt lighting and kelvins being temperature ... sorry can pls tell me the relation between this and tanning ??
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