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Old 16-01-2007, 06:53 PM   #1
johnny_fantics
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Default How to setup CO2 unit?? What is the neccessary equipment?

I belive most of the bros out here had already made similar post but i can't find the right articles/sticky threds. I am interested in knowing on how and what are the neccessary basic equipment for a CO2 setup like timer, co2 gas cylinder, bubble counter and staff incase when i went to the LFS and the uncle chop me. Minimun to maximun requirement. DIY also can. Any bros can guide and list them out??? Thanks alot.

John.
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Old 16-01-2007, 07:36 PM   #2
the_r0ck
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Ok, this can be a long post, maybe it can be a sticky or be part of a beginner FAQ:

Basic things of a CO2 pressurized cylinder unit:

CO2 Cylinder
Regulator (Manual or Electronic Solenoid)
Air Hose
Check Valve
Bubble Counter
Diffusor/Flipper/Reactor/Etc

Things good to have:

Timer (if using electronic solenoid)
CO2 Air Hose (more expensive, meant to combat the corrosion caused by the CO2. Usually black in color)


Accessories to have when setting up unit:
Spanner to tighten the regulator unto the Cylinder

Things to note after purchase:

After purchase, install regulator and DO NOT use it first. Open the main valve (the big one) on the cylinder and leave it overnight and check if the reading on the gauge is still the same to check for leakage of regulator.

If its an established tank, introduce the CO2 slowly, don't have 2bps at one go. Increase slowly daily. Use the CO2 ppm (pH/KH) relationship to determine CO2 levels and maintain at 30ppm. If you are using ADA soil, don't use the calcuation and use observation to set the bps at the maximum level that the fishes are comfortable with.
-Calvin
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Old 16-01-2007, 07:46 PM   #3
johnny_fantics
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Power rock bro. bps is bubbles per seconds right?? bps at the maximum level means as many bubbles as possible?? or the max in the chart??
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Old 16-01-2007, 08:30 PM   #4
the_r0ck
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Bubbles per second is not really a scientifc way and its not part of the pH/KH chart. The pH/KH chart determines how much CO2 you have in the water while the BPS basically tells you how much you are putting in.

2BPS for 2 tanks of the same dimensions but different introduction method, i.e. one is using flipper and the other using a diffusor will have different CO2 ppm readings. Aim for a consisitent ~30-35ppm reading.

Observation wise for tanks with ADA soil means that you just slowly increase the bps until you see signs of stress (or worse, even death). There will never be any hard and fast rule on how much exactly one should use. Its always a case by case basis. So when people tell you that you should always use a certain setting (say, 2bps for a 3 footer tank), ignore the person. Its a good general guide but never exact and never the same for 2 tanks.

-Calvin
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Old 18-01-2007, 01:52 AM   #5
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take noted. Thanks rock bro.
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Old 18-01-2007, 01:11 PM   #6
wilsonawt
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_r0ck View Post
Ok, this can be a long post, maybe it can be a sticky or be part of a beginner FAQ:

Basic things of a CO2 pressurized cylinder unit:

CO2 Cylinder
Regulator (Manual or Electronic Solenoid)
Air Hose
Check Valve
Bubble Counter
Diffusor/Flipper/Reactor/Etc

Things good to have:

Timer (if using electronic solenoid)
CO2 Air Hose (more expensive, meant to combat the corrosion caused by the CO2. Usually black in color)


Accessories to have when setting up unit:
Spanner to tighten the regulator unto the Cylinder

Things to note after purchase:

After purchase, install regulator and DO NOT use it first. Open the main valve (the big one) on the cylinder and leave it overnight and check if the reading on the gauge is still the same to check for leakage of regulator.

If its an established tank, introduce the CO2 slowly, don't have 2bps at one go. Increase slowly daily. Use the CO2 ppm (pH/KH) relationship to determine CO2 levels and maintain at 30ppm. If you are using ADA soil, don't use the calcuation and use observation to set the bps at the maximum level that the fishes are comfortable with.
-Calvin

Thanks bro, good read and more info on CO2 set up. just wondering if i have a tank without counter, what is the best way of ensuring that the output is not too much?
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Old 18-01-2007, 11:27 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wilsonawt View Post
Thanks bro, good read and more info on CO2 set up. just wondering if i have a tank without counter, what is the best way of ensuring that the output is not too much?
Its honestly very simply. Just look at your output from your device (be it diffusor or reactor. Flippers are easy as you can see the bubbles) and look at your fishes.

If you see ALOT of CO2 bubbles floating around you know you got a problem. Like wise, if your fishes show signs of stress then turn it down a little.

Honestly I don't see whay you shouldn't get a bubble counter. Its considered a "should-already-have" instead of a good to have, as its the easiest way to see how much you are trying to put in.

-Calvin
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Old 30-12-2009, 11:10 PM   #8
Kinetico
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What do you mean when there is a lot of CO2 bubbles there could be a problem?
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Old 30-12-2009, 11:34 PM   #9
the_r0ck
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Wah, you dig up such an old post.

Honestly I also cannot remember why I said that, since it has been for 2 years. But logically looking at it, if your tank is filled with CO2 bubbles misting the entire tank, it would mean that you are injecting too much CO2. Because it would endanger your fishes and that you are supplying more than necessary, which is a waste.
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Old 04-01-2010, 04:11 PM   #10
blu3her0
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Didn't know that a tank with lots of CO2 bubbles is a risk. Always thought the only problem caused is aesthetical.(tank wouldn't look as crystal clear) learn something new bro, thanks.
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